How to Ensure You Have the Right Insurance Coverage on Your Car

car-auto-insurance

We’ve all seen the commercials.  Allstate has Mayhem, State Farm has Jake, GEICO has the gecko, and the list goes on.  We all pay for car insurance because the law requires that we do.  We all know our car insurance can go up if we get a speeding ticket or are at fault for an accident.  But, do you know what the various types of coverage mean?

Liability Insurance – The State of Maryland requires that all passenger vehicles carry liability insurance.  Maryland has minimum coverage amounts that each vehicle must carry.  What does liability insurance cover?

Liability insurance covers damage you cause with your vehicle to another person.  This includes property damage and bodily injury.  Property damage is pretty self-explanatory.  If you hit another car with your car, this part of your coverage covers the cost to repair the damaged vehicle, up to your policy limits.  So, if you rear end a Honda Accord, you’re probably fully covered.  If you rear end a vintage Ferrari, your limits may not be adequate.

Bodily injury covers payment of medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, and a host of other potential areas related to injuries sustained by a person in a car accident, up to your policy limits.

Another area of coverage that ties into liability insurance is your uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.

Collision Insurance – If your car is damaged or destroyed in an accident, collision insurance coverage will typically pay to fix or replace it, up to certain limits (e.g., the value of your vehicle).  This coverage generally comes into play if you’re at fault for an accident and damage your own vehicle.  If you have a lien on your vehicle, you’re usually required to have collision coverage.  However, if you don’t have a lien on your vehicle, Maryland does allow you to opt of this coverage.

Collision coverage comes with a deductible. This means you have to pay a certain amount of the damage out of your pocket.  Any amount after that is typically covered up to the actual cash value of your car.  For example, if you have a $250.00 deductible, and the cost to repair your vehicle is $1,000.00, you will pay the first $250.00 and your insurance company will pay the remaining $750.00.  Generally, the higher your deductible, the lower your premium.    When making the decision to carry collision coverage, you should evaluate how much your car is worth.  If your car is worth a couple of thousand dollars, maybe it’s worth the gamble of not carrying it.  If your car is worth several thousand dollars, you may want to think about carrying collision coverage.

Comprehensive Insurance – This coverage pays for damage to your car caused by an event other than a collision, such as fire, theft, vandalism, if you hit an animal, or if you sustain flood damage.  Like collision, if there is a lien on the vehicle, you likely have to have this coverage.  The decision to carry this coverage, similar to collision, should be based on the value of your vehicle.

Your insurance agent can discuss these types of coverage with you in more detail and help you make a decision regarding the right types of coverage for you.

Having the right amount of coverage is very important if you’re involved in a car accident and you’re at fault.  It can mean the difference in seeing your insurance rates go up a little bit or having to liquidate assets in order to pay a settlement or judgment.  We’ll discuss policy limits and uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage in more detail in our next blog entry.

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Am I in Good Hands if I Have an Accident as an Uber Driver?

Technology continues to make life easier.  Most people can be reached in seconds by text, email, or phone.  You can have food delivered, set up appointments, make dinner reservations and request a ride all from your smart phone.

Uber generated approximately $1.5 billion to $2 billion of net revenue in 2015.  Most people under the age of 40 in a major metropolitan area have used Uber or Lyft.

Driving for services like Uber and Lyft have become popular ways for some people to supplement their income, or to generate their primary income.  One thing Uber drivers don’t always consider is the interplay between their personal automobile insurance and using their personal vehicle as a car-for-hire.

If you get into an accident and your personal automobile insurance carrier finds out you were acting as a car-for-hire, it’s just about guaranteed that they will deny coverage for the accident.  This means if you were at fault for the accident you could be left having to pay for any damage to property as well as medical bills and pain and suffering if anyone was injured.

Uber carries insurance in most states as a secondary policy to your policy.  This means, if your insurance carrier denies coverages, Uber’s insurance may provide coverage.  However, there is some fine print:  a) usually, Uber requires that you were running the Uber app at the time of the accident, meaning you were acting as an Uber driver.  If you weren’t, their insurance won’t cover you; b) in most states, Uber only carries the minimum amount of insurance coverage required in that state; c) Uber’s policy generally covers only its liability obligations.  This generally will not include the damage to your vehicle.

In order to make sure you’re not on the hook for thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of dollars for injury and property damage, contact your insurance company.  More and more carriers are offering additional coverage for their insureds who drive for Uber, Lyft, etc.